"I am deeply grateful for the magic of the internet gifting me the opportunity to learn from you here in Ecuador.
Very excited to keep practicing, you are awesome!"

Pyasa Chetan

"You are an inspiration to me; there are not many people in this world who have the passion you have!"

James Francois

"I wanted to let you know how much I am getting from your site, or more so, your
non-ego style of teaching. The July Darbuka challenge was the biggest jump of growth in my life."

Arne Pederson

Click here for a Free Preview of the Fingers of Fury Subscription Plans

The cart is empty

"This will transform the drumming community more than any dvd, book or workshop series could ever do, and I've purchased every dvd, book and attended every workshop in the USA at one point or another!"

Andrew DesChenes,
Subscriber

 

 

 

Darbuka Teaching Resources

PDF format coming soon!
Kaligi breakdown for Darbukac 2009 Matt Stonehouse

A frequent mistake that many beginning and experienced darbuka players make is cluttering the rhythm and overplaying. Trying to jam in as many notes as possible is not the objective of making good music. Think of the last conversation you had that was really enjoyable. Was it with someone that spoke the whole time without even taking a breath? Or was it with someone that actually listened to what you had to say with a genuine interest and then responded with a thoughtful reply? I’m sure your answer will be the latter. Making good music is no different to making good conversation. Many people have said that you can tell more about a person within ten minutes of playing music together than you could through talking for the whole day! Music is a concentrated conversation. It’s something that really is ‘in the now.’ That feeling of being lost in your music is just another way of feeling present to the moment, something that many of us struggle with in today’s society.

The topic of today’s darbuka lesson is simplicity! You are about to enter a whole new world that is Kaligi.

In Kaligi we have two groups of double ‘Ka’ strokes and a single ‘Ka’ at the end i.e;

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

Dum

Ka

Ka

Dum

Ka

Ka

Tak

Ka

The above version of Kaligi is what I would call ‘full’ Kaligi.

This next exercise shows Kaligi with only the ‘early Ka’ being played-

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

Dum

Ka

 

Dum

Ka

 

Tak

Ka

If we play the rhythm with just the ‘late Ka’ we have-

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

Dum

 

Ka

Dum

 

Ka

Tak

Ka

Not only has this simplified our darbuka playing but it has also given us two new versions of Kaligi i.e; Kaligi with early ‘Ka’ and Kaligi with late ‘Ka.’

Once you can comfortably switch between these two new rhythms on your darbuka, try some new variations such as the following two bar cycle:

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

Dum

 

Ka

Dum

Ka

 

Tak

Ka

Dum

Ka

 

Dum

Ka

 

Tak

 

I highly recommend spending as much time as possible experimenting with your own creations of this. I would also like to stress the importance of being able to just play the fundamental of Kaligi with one hand and with no ‘Ka’ tones i.e;

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

Dum

   

Dum

   

Tak

 

The mistake that I see many darbuka players making is pushing the second ‘Dum’ along to the second beat. This shows that not only are the ‘Ka’ strokes acting like commas, but they also serve as training wheels on a bike!

I will leave you with one more idea. This is a Kaligi funk rhythm with three ‘Dum’ tones and a new stroke called the ‘Puc.’ To do a ‘Puc’ we need to first learn the ‘Cup’ technique with our right hand, yes this really is another language!

Your teacher will show you how to cup with the right hand and then how to do this same technique using the thumb rather than the hand and little finger. This should leave all of your fingers facing down toward the skin.

Once you have become comfortable with this cupping technique and have produced the ‘Puc’ tone with your left hand, funk out with this:

1

e

&

a

2

e

&

a

Dum

 

Ka

Cup

Puc

Dum

Dum

 

The above darbuka rhythm is really just a funked up version of Kaligi.It has a third ’Dum’ tone added for extra groove. When playing this you should use your thumb to make the ‘Cup’ stroke. Note: When you play the ‘Cup’ stroke it is audible and included as a part of the rhythm.

Enjoy your drumming.

Matt Stonehouse

Click on the below options to see what is included-

FOF Darbuka Doumbek Bronze Memnbership

FOF Darbuka Doumbek Silver Memnbership

FOF Darbuka Doumbek Golden Memnbership

FOF Darbuka Doumbek Platinum Memnbership